owning-my-truth

mood-indie-go:

lovevlife:

pattilahell:

lifesentences:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Egypt’s government has called on US authorities to show restraint against protesters in Ferguson, Missouri.

It said it was “closely following the escalation of protests” after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white policeman on 9 August.

The statement echoes US President Barack Obama’s comments during Egypt’s crackdown on protesters in 2013.

Correspondents say the criticism is unusual since Egypt gets about $1.5bn (£1bn) in aid from the US every year.

President Obama is under increasing pressure to bring an end to the violent scenes in the St Louis suburb.

It is now 10 days since Michael Brown’s death, which sparked mass demonstrations.

Jay Nixon, the governor of Missouri, has ordered the National Guard to support police operations, but violence flared again on Monday night, with law enforcement officers arresting 31 people.

Police officers point their weapons at demonstrators protesting against the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri - 18 August 2014The unrest continued on Monday night, with police firing tear gas at crowds of demonstrators

The statement from Egypt’s foreign ministry followed a similar call from United Nations chief Ban Ki-moon, who called on Missouri police to abide by “US and international standards”.

Iran added its voice to the criticism, with Majid Takht-Ravanchi, the deputy foreign minister for European and American Affairs, saying the unrest was a sign of “the phenomenon of racism” in the West.

Meanwhile Chinese state news agency Xinhua said that despite the US playing the role of an international human rights defender, the clashes showed “there is still much room for improvement at home”.

"Obviously, what the United States needs to do is to concentrate on solving its own problems rather than always pointing fingers at others," the Xinhua editorial added.

Can we just get into the bold real quick… 

All these reads

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The bolded

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whitepeoplestealingculture
justbrad:

One of the few photos that I have of my Grandmother. She was a Fulani woman from Northern Nigeria who practiced Islam. Much like today, romantic relationships between Christians (Igbos) and Muslims (Hausa/Fulanis) in Nigeria were very rare and shunned.
A few years after my Dad was born, my Grandma, Nnuja Muhummad, and my Grandpa Dennis Ogbonna, ended their relationship due to the pressures of society. My Dad went with my Grandpa back to our homeland in Imo State in Southeastern Nigeria. He never saw or heard from his mother again.
My Dad died on December 26, 2011. All I have left are photographs and stories.

justbrad:

One of the few photos that I have of my Grandmother. She was a Fulani woman from Northern Nigeria who practiced Islam. Much like today, romantic relationships between Christians (Igbos) and Muslims (Hausa/Fulanis) in Nigeria were very rare and shunned.

A few years after my Dad was born, my Grandma, Nnuja Muhummad, and my Grandpa Dennis Ogbonna, ended their relationship due to the pressures of society. My Dad went with my Grandpa back to our homeland in Imo State in Southeastern Nigeria. He never saw or heard from his mother again.

My Dad died on December 26, 2011. All I have left are photographs and stories.

beautiesofafrique

paintchipsfromthewall:

the-goddamazon:

fuckyeahbiguys:

"I’m sick of how bisexuality is erased in LGBT spaces. I get really nervous before any LGBT event, especially Pride. I feel incredibly sad and hopeless when gay and lesbian people call me insulting names. If gay and lesbian people don’t understand me – Continue reading Prejudice at Pride at Empathize This

This just punched me in the heart.

wow

accrawalkintours

dynamicafrica:

Today’s style inspiration: Louis Philippe de Gagoue.

Hailing from both Cameroon and Cote D’Ivoire, the self-described eclectic fashion stylist, blogger and personal shopper is currently based in Morocco after half a decade living in neighbouring Tunisia.

With a style all his own, there’s a sense of vintage cool, classic sartorialism and modern vibrancy in almost everything he wears. From Congolese sapeurs to traditional North African garments, there’s always a strong African influence in de Gagoue’s visual aesthetic.

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All Africa, All the time.

dynamicafrica

accrawalkintours:

The Nima You should Know!

This is how colourful the people of Nima, a predominantly muslim community in Ghana celebrated the Ramadan Mubarak festivities. The best of traditional Africa fashion were on display. Food and Music were the order of the day in this lively community. Nima is one of the communities many people hold erroneous perception about. People who have not even visited Nima think it is a hub for criminals and many other social vices. But a visit to the community reveals you to freedom of expression, respect for authority and the free will to explore talent. Nima has the best of Local African dishes like TZ, Tubani, + many more! The Nima market is one of the busiest markets in Ghana.

The community is also filled with religious and academic scholars. Some of the amazing crop of young artists in Accra can be located at Nima. The Nima Muhinmanchi Art organization has been a platform for training many young people who want to be artists. Through accradotalt's CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival, Some of the members of the group have been the brains behind the graffiti murals inside the Old Kingsway Building in James Town. And they are going to be at #ChaleWote2014 on August 23 & 24.  

 WE LOVE NIMA! 

Photography by SELORMJAY